Exceptional Guidance, Expertise, & Customer Service - since 1984 Frontenac Outfitters Canoe and Kayak Centre Ontario's On-Water Paddlesports Centre Free test paddling 6 days a week

Plans for the long weekend?

Your unforgettable long weekend starts at Frontenac Outfitters!  Our rentals are in full swing this weekend, but we still have a few canoes, kayaks, and stand up paddleboards in our rental fleet for folks looking to get out paddling! If you’ve never tried a Stand up Paddle Board, this long weekend is the perfect opportunity to give one a try. Stand up Paddle Boards are growing in popularity owing to their ease of use, convenient accessibility, and ease of transportation.  Best of all SUP boarding is  a ton of fun, undeniably peaceful and an incredible low-impact workout! If you’re interested in getting started with SUP but don’t want to break the bank you will LOVE  the Jetty series of boards from Perception. We only have a handful of these remaining, so be sure to come paddle one soon! To learn a little more about getting started with SUP, check out our article on How to Improve you Stand Up Paddleboard Experience. Test Paddlers Get a Free Night’s Stay! We have a limited amount of campsites here at the shop, but we are offering a free night’s stay to anybody coming out to test paddle this weekend! As there are only five camping pads available, it’s a first-come, first-served basis. So give us a call or send us an email to let us know you’re coming, and we’ll be sure to set you up with a campsite! A Long Weekend with Long-Boat Savings  Performance Touring Kayaks (sea kayaks) will always be the cream of the crop when it comes to paddling. And while we don’t have any sea conditions close by, there’s a number of reason why these kayaks are the...

Another Canadian Manufacturer Lost

Change! Our world, its people, and businesses are continually changing even when we would rather they didn’t. Today is one such occasion as Ontario based icon Mid-Canada Fiberglass (MCF) – makers of Scott Canoes, Bluewater Canoes and Impex / Formula Kayaks – is closing its doors after 53 years in business.   In 1960 to better service the increasing number of tourists and paddlers exploring Algonquin Provincial Park the very first Scott Canoe was created in a tiny basement workshop. Scott Canoe grew steadily until they became the largest canoe builder in Canada. At their peak MCF offered a whopping 35 canoe models in a multitude of lay-ups that included fibreglass, Kevlar, ultralites, Royalex and Royalite.   In 1999 MCF unveiled Formula Kayaks, a quality composite line of skeg style sea kayaks to the Canadian market. Later the name was changed to Impex Kayaks as the line expanded into the United States and beyond. Impex Kayaks grew to become a major player in the North American paddlesports industry until the 2008 global recession, which vastly reduced sales within the U.S. market.   Bluewater Canoes, originally located in Guelph Ontario, was added to MCF’s offerings in 2002. Bluewater Canoes introduced ‘vacuum bagging’ – a high tech pressure process that produces stronger and lighter boats than traditional hand lay-ups. Accordingly, Bluewater Canoes was widely regarded as the ‘Holy Grail’ in canoe quality and design for decades.     A visit to MCF’s 50,000 square-foot New Liskeard Ontario based manufacturing facility and retail outdoor gear outlet was always a fun and unique experience. Beyond canoes & kayaks their factory also made a full...

Bring A Survival Kit – It Might Save Your Life

Don’t think you need a kayak or canoe survival kit? Think again. Even if you’re just going out for an afternoon trek across the bay, you never know what’s going to happen out there. The weather can quickly take a drastic change, a rogue wave can capsize you, equipment problems can stranded you in a remote location. As the old saying goes- it’s better to have a survival bag and not need it, than need one and not have it… or something like that! Canoe & Kayak Survival Kits go by several names: bailout bags, safety kits, survival bags, etc. And we’re not just talking about a first aid kit and a cell phone here. A well equipped survival kit should include the following items: A handheld marine radio (with weather bands) A handheld compass A GPS unit (optional) Waterproof matches Fire starter An emergency blanket A first aid kit (marine variety) A small fishing kit (line, hooks, bobbers, plastic worms, etc) Several flares A flashlight with extra batteries An emergency strobe light A air blow fog/air horn Duct tape (Red Green would be proud) 30- foot length of rope Emergency food rations — energy bars, food sticks, etc 2- Liters’ of water per person Sunscreen Bug repellant Toilet paper (not optional) We know this sounds like a lot of STUFF to be hauling about but you’d be surprised with how much equipment can be stowed in a good 6×12″ or 8×14″ dry bag. Remember, a good dry bag correctly stored serves the dual purpose of adding a little extra flotation to your kayak or canoe. You can always...

Canoe and Kayak Photography Tips

Capture those amazing moments on the water! One of the great things about paddling is that it gets you out into nature and away from the crowds and the bustle of everyday tourist attractions. It also presents the alert canoe or kayak photographer with opportunities to take some unforgettable wildlife and scenic photos – whether you’re shooting film or digital. Now, if you’re a whitewater paddler, you probably don’t have time to do much photography – at least when you’re out on the water. But there are always those breaks between runs, when a good camera can come in handy indeed. And of course if you’re a flat-water paddler, there will often be many opportunities to give that camera shutter a workout.   Kayak Photography Tip #1  If you’re shooting wildlife, it’s always a good idea to make your approach from upwind and at a distance. Just let your boat drift into the scene, moving closer and closer, and wait for the wildlife to adjust to your presence. Having a longer zoom lens always helps in getting those great close-up shots.   Tip #2 Dusk and dawn are the best times. The light in the morning and evening has that soft, buttery quality that makes for great photographs. And the wildlife is active in those times as they hunt, forage for food, and go about their business.   Tip #3 Get as close as you can. Even with a zoom or telephoto lens, it seems like the best photographs are taken up close, within 30 or 40 feet of your subject. Make eye contact if you can, and move...